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Author Topic: Arthur Lydiard Thread
bomber

Spawn
Posts: 13
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: January 8, 2014, 19:53
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you pair of luddites 😀

Quote from SallyFiver on January 8, 2014, 16:27<br />

Quote from CarnalNobbage on January 5, 2014, 17:53<br /><br />
I like the original fartlek: speed play. Go by how you feel on the day, at the moment. These others should be called interval-tempos or something.l

</p>
<p>Agreed.

SallyFiver

Crustation
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: January 8, 2014, 22:22
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Sounds like Lydiardites, Luddites….

Wootang

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: January 10, 2014, 11:31
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I don’t even like doing speed work, except when it is directly planned towards a specific upcoming race. Fartlek for me is more like super hilly and mountainous runs versus regular running…but going hard on the hills.

Wetcoast

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: October 23, 2014, 19:08
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Arthur Lydiard Foundation is coming to Seattle November 7 – 9 and Victoria, BC on Vancouver Island November 14 to 16:

http://athleticsillustrated.com/editorial/lydiard-foundation-teaching-arthur-lydiards-world-class-training-method/

Christopher Kelsall.
Owner, editor and publisher of Athletics Illustrated. An online magazine that covers the sport of athletics with a world view from a Canadian perspective.

Wootang

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: October 23, 2014, 22:59
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This is a good opportunity to learn the way the Africans run.

Bob1

Crustation
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: October 23, 2014, 23:03
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Pyramid scheme. Build a big foundation of miles. Until you have hit your limit of building and improving and move into a hill phase, but not a long one, then move into anaerobic/speed phase for 4 to 6 weeks, then coordinate the package up. No-brainer template. The brainer part is the next step in coaching, to react to situations properly. Prescribe what is needed at any given time.

bomber

Spawn
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: November 2, 2014, 04:28
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I have a little known book that has the paces of 1/2, 3/4, etc…give me til tomorrow to find it in my library…

jacobrunni-
ng

Spawn
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: February 24, 2015, 23:37
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I’ve read through the whole thread, but never at one time and so this might already be here, but I would be curious from the experts to see a detailed sample week from each phase of training?

We could hypothetical this into a 5k runner who is wanting to break 16 minutes for 5k.

The board seems to be in a lull and I’m interested in learning!

Thanks!
Jacob

Wetcoast

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: February 24, 2015, 23:49
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Hi Jacob,

Thanks for bringing the Lydiard thread back to life. It did get a good volume of traffic, then quieted down. I am sure you will have responses soon. Here are a couple of links. One goes to an article about Lydiard Basics that I wrote, called, of all things, Lydiard Basics, the other one is written by Nobby Hashizume and does a great job of expanding on it: http://athleticsillustrated.com/editorial/lydiard-basics/

http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CDcQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fitnesssports.com%2Flyd_clinic_guide%2FArthur%2520Lydiard.pdf&ei=DkbtVOSlB4KXoQSo9YLABA&usg=AFQjCNHy5UY_8h96WsVSJVcNbcAV0TQChg&sig2=lDdl7mUczgfKgIGYMV-BJQ&bvm=bv.86956481,d.cGU

Christopher Kelsall.
Owner, editor and publisher of Athletics Illustrated. An online magazine that covers the sport of athletics with a world view from a Canadian perspective.

Bob1

Crustation
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: February 25, 2015, 00:07
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Marathon training phase, to build your aerobic house:

12 weeks or as long as you need:

Mon – Easy 60
Tue – Strong 90
Wed – Easy 40 – 60
Thu – Strong 90
Fri – Fartlek 60
Sat – Long or Aerobic tempo
Sun – Long or Aerobic tempo

Hills: 4 weeks, 3 sessions per week.

Depends.

Keep the long run, keep the fartlek. Add bounding, springing, or in modern day efforts also add box jumps, plyometrics and short alactic hill sprints.

Anaerobic – 4 to 6 weeks.

Keep the long run.

Two to three sessions of “speed” work. Start longer and slower like mile repetitions or km repetitions, bring the distance down week to week, bring the effort up.

Get down to 200s and 400s.

Coordination (practice) 4 weeks

Keep the long run, but during the hill and anaerobic phase and this phase, they are getting easier. The long runs were quite strong in the aerobic phase.

Two to three time trial sessions per week. Under distance, over distance and at distance if the race is short enough. All out effort without stressing and straining. So a 17:00 runner will run 3K at 17:00 pace or 5K at 17:30/17:45 and or 10K at 39-ish. Although 10K might be long for a time trial, should do 7 or 8K at 10K pace, so 35-pace.

Little taper.

The mileage should only drop at the end of the anearobic speed phase and coordination phase, but not too much. Then you have a short taper for a 5K.

Even having mile and 2K time trials at Lactate threshold are good.

This is not 100% exactly as Lydiard would schedule, but very similar. Also, a schedule laid out in advance should be changeable all the time, as you respond as an athlete….

Wetcoast

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: February 25, 2015, 00:12
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Jacob,

Bob1 is roughly correct. That is the basics. I would add that the mileage volume can be more, but that depends on what you are used to. So you can add in the aerobic phase other supplemental mileage that is easy, off road or on treadmill, quite a bit.

I would also add that you don’t want to move on from the aerobic phase just because 12 weeks have passed, but have a specific route that you run at the exact same EFFORT every week or 10 days. The same out and the same back route, each time….when you start coming home earlier than you used to, then you are fitter – but NEVER RACE these runs: SAME EFFORT. Once you stop improving with them, then move onto the hill phase. Many people don’t use the hill phase or don’t use it properly. Do it though, keeping the mileage up.

Christopher Kelsall.
Owner, editor and publisher of Athletics Illustrated. An online magazine that covers the sport of athletics with a world view from a Canadian perspective.

jacobrunni-
ng

Spawn
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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: February 25, 2015, 10:33
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Thanks. I think for me the coordination phase has always been the hardest to understand.

Guest

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: May 11, 2015, 13:17
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Anyone see the thread at LetsRun about 50/50. All sorts of answers about the efficacy of the workout. Personally, I used them only a couple of times before big races because I already had good speed and good nuero-muscular coordination having done a lot of strides and stuff.

Anyone else use 50/50s effectively?

Guest

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: May 11, 2015, 20:42
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What about 100/100 or 100/50??? Or hard as possible-die-jog-hard aspossible-die recover – repeat?

Mizner

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: May 11, 2015, 21:09
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Here we go loop-the-loop. 50/50 is great because when you sprint all out you know it has to be hard as 50m isn’t very far away and the recovery is short, and you should know why you are doing it, so be ready mentally to go flat out again. The other go until you can’t sound alright, but people will slow down for survival, no question.

Wetcoast

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Post Re: Arthur Lydiard Thread
on: May 11, 2015, 21:20
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I agree with Mizner. I have used 150m/100m recovery to experiment, as well as 150/50m….I find that the longer sprint, you can start to reach or flail or flag after 60 or 70m. I think you reach maximum speed before that, so go max, recovery and the fatigue will accumulate, which is a stress your want to create, so during the recovering you can come out stronger, especally shuttling lactic acid and at least to me importantly aiding in nuero-muscular stimulus/coordination.

Christopher Kelsall.
Owner, editor and publisher of Athletics Illustrated. An online magazine that covers the sport of athletics with a world view from a Canadian perspective.

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