Maurice Tarrant Interview

August 4, 2011 0

© Copyright – 2009 – Athletics Illustrated

Maurice Tarrant of Victoria, BC holds or has held 59 Canadian age-group road and track records spanning distances from 3,000-metres to the half-marathon. He turns 80 in less than a year from now (January 4, 2010) and will continue to tear apart the Canadian record books.

At 75-years-of-age Tarrant ran the Bazan Bay 5K in Sidney, (just outside of Victoria) finishing with a time that when calculated on the WAVA age-grade calculator works out to 14:17, which past winners Dave Milne, Graham Hood, Scott Simpson, Jim Finlayson or anyone else have managed to achieve on this course. In fact, 14:17 would be the open course record by nearly half a minute, which Milne currently holds with his time of 14:44.

Tarrant has been at this assault of the Canadian age-group records for some time. Fourteen years ago he took down the 65–69 age-group 10K record, crossing the line in 37:29, which translates to a 29:22, another ‘plus 90%’ age-grade level performance. At the age of 58 he ran a half-marathon in Seattle in 76:20, which works down to a 64:33, a standard only a handful of Canadians manage in the open category.

Another astounding standard of his is the fact that Tarrant has won 230 consecutive Vancouver Island Race Series races, following his three victories so far this year.

What is the secret to his continued success?

Tarrant grew up active; he ran competitively through his youth, so I asked him, “in your early years did your high level of physical fitness allow you to make a smooth comeback at middle age?”

“Yes I believe so. By the age of eighteen I was playing rugby in the winter and rowing during the summer in bow position for coxed fours. In rowing we trained six days a week and were well coached, resulting in several successful years in this sport. Another factor that helped in my development was that my family never owned a car, so I walked, took the bus or ran everywhere! Including home from school at the age of ten to deliver newspapers!”

Tarrant hales from Devon, England. Yes he grew up involved in sports and delivering those newspapers on the run.  It is likely his early conditioning gave him the ability to make steady progress from running a half-mile loop on his lunch breaks at work, building up to 80-kilometres per week minimum (50 miles), including a 16 to 20 mile long run every-other-week.

Tarrant joined the Royal Air Force at the age of 21. The following year he was talked into entering a half-mile track race where he finished second. He ran competitively in cross-country, track and road races, representing Devon in an inter-county meet at White City. He found road running as fun then as it is now.

Christopher Kelsall: What do you attribute in your current fitness level at nearly 80-years-of-age?

Maurice Tarrant: Running has become a lifestyle for me; I enjoy the fitness it brings and the companionship of other runners during training or racing. Keeping to fairly regular training program of at least three runs a week with “rest” days in between. This could be weight training; I prefer the rowing machine, or carrying out projects such as gardening or home improvements. In other words staying active!!

Don’t assume by the above statement by Maurice that he isn’t a little competitive, John Woodall, who in self deprecating style refers to himself as ‘Mr. Second’ had this to say about Maurice:

Christopher,

Maurice and I went for our Saturday morning training run, along Lochside trail. Maurice, ran me into the ground and after completing the 22K, I was left the usual “blethering incoherent idiot.” He is on a new kick this week, with a new watch giving him his heart rate. He likes to run at a 120 HR, my HR is reading 155, he is a marvel of the running world. I feel that I am very lucky and privileged to run with such a good and knowledgeable friend. He is unquestionably a member of the ‘Outliers Club’.

Maurice seems to be really looking forward to his 80th birthday, where his ambition I am sure, is to break every age related record in the book. He is setting me up to run 80K on his 80th birthday as a celebration, what do you think to that idea.

Cheers,

John
(Mr. Second)

CK: You have been married for 58 years; Phyllis must have been very supportive to allow you to race as much as you have for the past 30 years.

MT: I could not have stayed so fit and well without the support and love from my partner in life. Phyllis not only supports my running but she keeps me healthy by baking and cooking meals full of nutrition and has plenty of fruit in the home at all times.

CK: Do you practice a strict diet of any sort?

MT: Not really, I avoid red meats and I am mostly vegetarian. I enjoy chicken and fish. I try not to over eat, but I have a passion for desserts, when I can over indulge. I like a sherry every day and a glass of wine 4 or 5 times a week, with the odd beer or two. (draft preferred)

CK: Are you doing any special training to get ready for the 80+ age-group records?

MT: Not yet. However it is my intention to increase the number of running days in the week from three to four or five. This will include some track work in my program. I want to do this six or eight months prior to my next birthday.

CK: Who (if any) are your running heroes?

MT: Past: Chris Chataway, Chris Brasher, Roger Bannister, Gordon Pirie and John Landy.

Present: Jon Brown, Jim Finlayson, Todd Howard and Scott Simpson.

CK: Did you suggest your current running heroes are Scott Simpson and Todd Howard, to get some free professional physio, massage or acupuncture, as you ramp up the mileage?

MT: What a great idea, perhaps you could be my P.R. person?

CK: (laughing) …Done.

Tarrant’s (masters) personal bests

Mile           5:00.02
5K              16:54
8K             27:49
10K            34:26
15K            53:34
20K           1:12:54
21.1K         1:16:20
Marathon 2:58:55
50K           4:25:15

CK: Do you have any specific time or percentage goals for next year, perhaps keeping the percentage of age over 90?

MT: I would like to take my performance to over 90%. In my late fifties I managed a 93.1%, but I would settle for 90.01%!!

 

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